Posts Tagged ‘nature’

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - April 3

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - Only $3.97, Was $19.95. Save 80%!

Click http://www.chinaberry.com to see today’s specially-discounted item.

Today (4/3/12) Only. Price goes back up tomorrow (4/4/12).

Limit one per customer.

5 Stars; Watch Video!

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - Sept 6

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - Only $3.97, Was $19.95. Click http://www.chinaberry.com to see today’s specially-discounted item. Today (9/6/11) Only. Price goes back up tomorrow (9/7/11). Limit one per customer. Shop Now!

Taking Ourselves Off Automatic

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

[Dear Friends letter from our sister site Isabella Catalog.]

I’m having an issue with the trees and plants in my back yard. After over 10 years of everything thriving, something’s not right. Several of my favorite trees are starting to die, and the arborists I’ve consulted speculate that the trees are just getting so much water that the soil doesn’t have a chance to dry out enough to suit these particular trees.

The solution? Completely turn off the irrigation system and water by hand, selectively giving more or less water to appropriate parts of the yard. ‘You’ve got to be kidding,’ was my first reaction. I’m used to my sprinklers coming on every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. For 5 minutes. In the dark of night. While I’m sleeping and not even aware that anything is going on out there. So convenient. So automatic. So clean and hassle-free.

But you know what? It turns out that the mandate to get outside and hand-water my yard is the best thing that could have happened to me (yard-wise, anyway). As I stand there with hose in hand, looking, really looking, at each and every plant and tree, I find myself infinitely more connected to my little corner of nature. I marvel at how abundant and big the succulents have gotten since I planted them 2 years ago. Time to divide them and give them more breathing room. I notice the Staghorn Fern isn’t doing so well in the spot I had it, and I search out a better place for it. The delicate spray of my hose finds and showcases a perfect and exquisite spider web I wouldn’t have otherwise seen. The Gardenia needs some fertilizer, and, whoa, there’s a bird’s nest I hadn’t noticed!

(more…)

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - July 26

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - Only $2.97, Was $12.97. Click http://www.chinaberry.com to see today’s specially-discounted item. Today (7/26/11) Only. Price goes back up tomorrow (7/27/11). Limit one per customer. Shop Now!

Letting Them Fail

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Last spring and summer I was hooked on watching a webcam from a Barn Owl house in southern California. Molly and McGee, the two owls living there, were in the family way, and I was fortunate enough to be online when one of their owlets hatched. In the following weeks, there were stunning live views of McGee bringing food (rats, gophers, etc.) back to the nest and Molly feeding the owlets. Eventually Molly was able to leave the babies alone and hunt, too, as their growing appetites became true forces to deal with. Little by little, as the scrawny, homely owlets exchanged their wispy down for gorgeous brown and grey feathers, things changed. Molly and McGee weren’t around as much. They still brought food, but now the babies had to rip the flesh, themselves, if they wanted to eat.

As the owls grew bigger and bigger, the owl house seemed to get smaller and smaller. Eventually, the oldest one (they hatch just a few days apart) started to hang around on the outside perch at night, surveying the surroundings. Molly and McGee were still delivering food, but it became apparent that the oldest owl would soon be expected to find and return with his own meals. But first he had to actually fledge — fly from the owl house for the very first time. After hours and hours and several nights of what I’m going to call ‘getting his nerve up,’ he launched himself through the air, returning just a few moments later. It was a stirring sight, and I was humbled by somehow being a part of a phenomenon that occurs countless times every day on this planet.Then came the night he knew, and Molly and McGee knew, that it was time for him to find his own food and get it back up to the owl house. We viewers didn’t get to see him find his prey, but he had me on pins and needles as he struggled to get the rodent, half his size, back up to the owl house. It took what looked like a painful number of tries to succeed, but eventually he did, and Molly and McGee didn’t interfere throughout the effort.

As a parent who has had to watch my own children struggle at certain points during their lives, it was excruciating to see the owl try and fail, try and fail, over and over again. Yet, with each attempt, he was figuring something out. He was tiring, but he was also getting stronger. And whatever you call ‘confidence’ in owls, he certainly was growing in that as well. Now he’s out on his own, being a perfect owl, somewhere. Molly and McGee knew every step of the way what to do when, and what not to do. There are some aspects of Nature that you just can’t argue with, no matter what. As challenging as it may be for parents to watch our kids experience failure and learn from it, I think we would do well to take this lesson from Molly and McGee to heart.

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - January 18

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

One-Day Tuesday Mystery Item - Only $2.97, Was $15.99.

Click http://www.chinaberry.com to see today’s specially-discounted item.

Today (1/18/11) Only. Price goes back up tomorrow (1/19/11).

Shop Now!

One-Day Tuesday Special Savings!

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

Save 82% on The Four Seasons, today’s “One-Day Tuesday” special discounted item.

Was $16.95, Today (06/29/10) Just $2.97! Price goes back up tomorrow (06/30/10). Shop Now!

Kids will eagerly pore over each page of this look at the annual cycle of the seasons. It has loads of information about why we even have seasons, what animals do in each time period, how plants change, how animals know when to migrate, and many other details.

This fact-filled compendium is packed with color illustrations and includes 4 color overlays that identify dozens of animals in their native habitat. Curious children will appreciate the vast amount of material.

Words of Wisdom From Patricia Clifford

Friday, May 28th, 2010

“The work will wait while you show the child a rainbow, but the rainbow won’t wait while you do the work.” - Patricia Clifford

Chinaberry’s Quest for Safe and Effective Sun Protection

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010

AOL News released an article today saying that many sunscreens may actually be accelerating cancer. Chinaberry Inc. couldn’t agree more. For over a decade, our company has been researching safe and effective sunscreens for our two catalogs, Chinaberry.com and IsabellaCatalog.com. We were on the anti-oxybenzone, retinol, and paraben bandwagon when just about every sunscreen label included these ingredients.

A few years ago, when more and more companies began using nanosized titanium dioxide without having to disclose it, Chinaberry decided it was time to oversee the production of our own private label sunscreen, Perfect for the Sol. Janet Kelly, a licensed esthetician working for Chinaberry, says, “It had gotten to the point where even once-reliable vendors were utilizing nanotechnology to help their sunscreens appear more like the mainstream chemical sunscreens people were accustomed to. The problem with that is we haven’t even begun to understand the serious health implications related to nanotechnology. To be on the safe side, we developed our own natural sunscreen that is guaranteed to be free of synthetics, retinols, and nanotechnology. We feel it’s the best natural sunscreen available.” So if you’re ready to throw in the beach towel, along with your sunscreen, after reading the latest research on the dangers lurking in your tube of sun protection, know there IS a safe and effective alternative.

Years of research went into creating Chinaberry’s Perfect for the Sol. Its SPF 25 offers full-spectrum protection against UVA and UVB rays, it’s biodegradable, and it’s great for both your face and body. It’s not too greasy, doesn’t appear chalky-white, and the very subtle smell of essential oils of vanilla and lavender makes it perfect for men, women, and children. In addition to the active ingredients of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, it includes an abundance of anti-aging and moisturizing ingredients such as rose hips oil, green tea, and shea butter (all organic). While it is water-resistant, it is not waterproof because it doesn’t contain petroleum (that’s a good thing!).

To read more or to place an order, go to the Perfect for the Sol page on the Chinaberry website.

To contact us with any questions or concerns please email Janet Kelly at PublicRelations@Chinaberry.net.

Enter the Land of Dirt and Bugs

Friday, February 5th, 2010

I don’t think there is a worm left in our yard that hasn’t been turned. My son has discovered the joys of digging in the soil, and every rock, block, and grain of sand has been flipped in his search for underground creatures. At any given time I am sure to find a container of dirt in the yard, a new ”home” for his bugs until he releases them back to the earth. I think his fingernails will always have dirt embedded underneath them, despite my attempts with a nailbrush and a firm scrubbing every night.

I used to enjoy digging and getting dirty too, back when I was called a ”tomboy,” rode an oversized bicycle around the neighborhood, and didn’t come home until the streetlights came on. I spent spring days after school outside with my mom’s trowel, digging big holes in the yard (which I know my mom appreciated!). I’d happily scrape my trowel deep enough to reach past the sandy top layer, through the moist dark layer, down to the red clay treasure until it was too hard to dig anymore.

This spring, may we all have time to dig a little deeper and get our hands messy alongside our kids. By gardening, bug hunting, and exploring in the dirt together, we not only connect with our children and to the earth, we are also reminded of the outdoor memories of our own childhood. Remember the delight of holding a leaf that was bigger than your head or the fascination of watching an earthworm or caterpillar wriggle in front of you? And of course you could just take a trowel and dig as deep a hole as possible, not with any purpose, but just because you can!